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20121101
20121130
STATION
KNTV (NBC) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened in katrina. nbc's katy tur is with us from the hard hit jersey shore tonight. katy, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. that is certainly the big question, up and down the new jersey shore, the aftereffects of sandy are still being felt. we're on long beach island. it's a barrier island, it's literally where the atlantic ocean meets the bay. and here, dozens of homes still look like this, their bottom floors completely washed away when the powerful storm surge came through. the last time kyle burns house looked like this was 1950, the year it was built. >> bed, couches, chairs, everything was just floating around. it was a mess. >> reporter: two feet of rushing water and sand soaked this third generation family beach home. with gas lines restored, the people of colgate on lbi are finally allowed to come back. >> they're old. '78. >> reporter: as residents count their personal losses, state officials are looking at the big numbers. >> when you look at the damage done because of the density of new york, the number of people affected, the number of properties affected wa
to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here a
of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, then, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter: lisa dunn and her family lost th
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
is that there are pockets that are very similar to some of the hardest-hit areas after katrina. >> reporter: the company plans to help rebuild seaside heights, still closed off to residents. back in staten island, patrice says she doesn't know what's next, but she does know what she needs. >> i need some place to stay permanently. that i can afford to pay once fema help ends. >> reporter: and this is a community-based center run by volunteers. also fema has set up 55 centers throughout the hardest-hit areas of staten island. >> michelle frandsen, thank you. >>> meanwhile, the red cross says it's received $117 million in donations to help victims of sandy. and tells us that so far its response has been near flawless. but that's not what we heard in some hard-hit areas of new york city where storm victims claim the country's preeminent disaster relief organization has been missing in action. here's nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: two weeks after sandy hit, residents of breezy point, new york, still wonder if more help will ever arrive. >> we haven't seen red cross at all.
comparisons to katrina, there's a reason for it. things are starting to look and feel like a deep, long-haul disaster. the grisly business of finding bodies, the daily realization that the face of the earth has changed, especially along the jersey shore. this is the new contour of the jersey shore. and right where we are is the borderline between two towns which have been in the news, bayhead to the north. six miles down is seaside heights, new jersey, almost impossible to see what's left of the ferris wheel and the amusement tower. from seaside heights, new jersey, this is what we found on the beach, one of the 57 chevy replicas that was part of the ride. the ocean gave this quite a ride. but just pause and think about the number of 4 and 5-year-olds who got their first thrill on a carnival ride at the beach right in this front seat with the safety bar down to protect them. there are two kinds of damage along the jersey shore. these are the first pictures taken from beach level of some of the fanciest sections. one of these houses was valued at $13 million the day before the storm arri
katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy victims. help is on the way, and that's the message sent by errol heights students and faculty. the group is on a mission to send this semi-trailer stocked withed food, blankets and other helpful items. well, i'm lynn berry. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >>> well, a dangerous fire forced officials to evacuate an entire town. close to 1,000 people received orders to abandon their homes. a chemical fire erupted from this derailed train car and then began leaking dangerous fumes. the evacuation order is still in effect until that fire burns out. >>> all right. new images show one animal's odd connection to halloween. a massachusetts fisherman caught this female lobster last week. look there. see? scientists say the crustacean, she is half orange, she's half black. the crustacean's split coloring happens every 50 to 100 million lobsters. that orange and black is the most common color combination. interesting. >>> well, class was in session when a drunken intruder b
$50 billion making it the nation's fourth costliest disaster behind katrina, 9/11 and hurricane andrew. >>> homeowners in new york, new jersey, and connecticut may be spared a costly deductible after state governors declared sandy did not make landfall as a hurricane. >>> and business is about to boom for companies that made oprah's annual favorite things list. a few of this year's favs, an $1800 battery and peddle powered bike, microsoft's new $500 surface tablet and a $40 blue velvet cake. you're watching "early today." >>> we are watching a nice weekend forecast shaping up in many areas of the west. only need the umbrella in a few spots. clouds lingering on the coast with on-and-off showers in areas like portland. temperatures seeable for this time of year. still lingering moisture in the northwest. looking mostly cloudy up there. nice in the southwest and areas traveling the inner mountain west, no problems whatsoever. enjoy your weekend. >> bill, thanks so much. >>> a bucks county, pennsylvania, family is still without power like millions of other power in the northeast. this fami
. >> this is our katrina. >> reporter: in new jersey and new york more than 4,000 residents are staying in shelters. nearly a quarter of a million people are still without power nearly two weeks after the storm hit. on long island, protests and anger that the utility company lipa hasn't worked quickly enough. >> we are cold, tired and we want our power now. >> reporter: today the agency says power has been restored to 93% of long island. meanwhile new york joined new jersey ordering gas rationing rules to help reduce long lines and frustration at the pump. this as hundreds of volunteers fanned out across neighborhoods including staten island to bring relief. part of new york city's designated volunteer day to help the thousands still dealing with sandy's destruction and showing the victims that they are not alone. >> thank you for helping. i appreciate it. >> reporter: homeland security secretary janet napolitano is scheduled to be back tomorrow. this time to visit a disaster recovery site in staten island. meantime, residents here are still waiting for the power to come on. governor chris christie
, they're struggling with the question many in new orleans dealt with after katrina. should they go back home and rebuild at all? sayreville is at the intersection there and has been flooded over and over. nbc chief correspondent anne thompson has more on some residents who have had enough. webber avenue, they do a strange thing. taking away debris, but not the heartache of a neighborhood in ruins orange stickers declare 230 homes uninhabitable. including this one. >> it is like a death, a dead body, i have to look at it like we swam for our life. >> reporter: for the third time in three years, she and her neighbors deal with flood damage, the 2010 nor'easter, hurricane irene and then sandy. >> we didn't buy these houses saying oh, you know, it is a flood zone, who cares? i researched the house, they didn't flood in 13 years, the research at the time showed the flood insurance affordable. >> reporter: they rebuilt two times. >> we came back in to rebuild. because it was our home. >> reporter: this time the numbers don't add up. >> it doesn't make economic sense to put more money into the
all of katrina across the entire gulf region. and this got a lot of people's attention this weekend when it appeared in the new york times, the picture of the statue of liberty kind of what-if question a look at what the climate change and coastlines up and down the east coast will look like. our report from our chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. >> reporter: these are the images few ever expected to see. the train stations in new jersey hit by water from superstorm sandy. yet scientists say this type of destruction could become far more frequent because of the heat-trapping greenhouse gases warming the planet. >> we could see by the end of the century, storms as high as sandy, as much as once every 15 years or more often, because storms surges will start from a higher sea level. >> reporter: how high? a recent study suggests we are in line for a five-foot sea level rise, given all the fossil fuels we have already burned. look at the projections for the gulf of mexico, that risk puts new orleans up five feet, spreading 25 feet along the coast, the ocean swallo
impactful than hurricane katrina and now both new york and new jersey are asking for a combined total of more than $71 billion in federal aid. well, in new york the money would not only pay for cleanup and recovery, it would also be used to try and limit damage from future storms. new jersey, which saw heavy damage to its transit system and shoreline, suffered nearly $30 billion in losses. meanwhile, new jersey governor chris christie says it would be wrong for him to leave office before his state recovers. christie has now filed papers seeking re-election. >>> let's get a check of your weather with nbc meteorologist bill karins. busy in the west. checking a big storm, right? >> not for today. we have one more day to enjoy the sunshine and nice weather. the rest of the country won't be jealous of your weather anymore. looks like a rainy period wednesday an thursday with a couple big storms coming onshore. they're calling this the atmospheric river that will be heading into the west coast. all that means is a big plume of moisture in the pacific will be heading onshore. bundle yourself
sandy is worse than hurricane katrina. governor cuomo says sandy hit a more densely hit area. the governor says his state now needs $42 billion to recover from all that damage. $9 billion of that amount will help prepare for future storms by protecting the power grid and the cell phone network. >>> a spokesperson for the israeli army is under fire after appearing online in black face. scott mcgrew says it is a startling misstep for an organization that has been tech savvy until now. >> we were talking about how the israeli defense force was using twitter and youtube and facebook to generate support in ways that we had never seen before during war time. but this picture is doing just the opposite. this is idf spokesperson on facebook. he smeared his face with mud and he has written the caption "obama style." he has since taken his facebook pictures private. one commenter asked if it is appropriate to mock the president of the united states considering how much money the u.s. sends to israel. some context here. this picture was apparently taken at the dead sea some months ago a
immediate affect. if you look at a storm, even a storm as great as katrina, which was obviously devastating to an entire region and probably greater in terms of its impact than the current storm, you did see it in the numbers during the one quarter in 2005, but the rebound was extremely quick. you can barely see the affect of the storm in gdp numbers after that. the one nice thing about our economy it tends to recover quite quickly. >> do you agree with that? what's your take. on top of everything you have this gas problem as well. everyone wanting gasoline and unable to fwet it. >> yep. my mother-in-law is out in new jersey. she got her power back on thursday. i was happy that she was okay. i think just the way we do the numbers has goofy implication that your house gets knocked down. you rebuild a new one. you are no better off than you were before bit counts as an increase to the gdp because they are counting the part you are doing right now, not what was already there. >> what about the infrastructure the story? governor cuomo last week said when new york rebuilds it will rebuild better
and unwater the city of new orleans after hurricane katrina. >> many others have been dispatched from illinois to share what they learned from katrina several years ago. >> reporter: how much water do we need to pump out? >> our estimates at this point in time are 300 to 400 million gallons of water. and it's growing. >> reporter: and even though there's not as much overall as there was in new orleans, he says the job in new york is much more difficult. >> it's not the amount of water that's the problem, it's where it is. >> it's where it is, yeah. >> and where it is is underground in miles and miles of subway and road tunnels. >> some of those tunnels are up to 2 miles long. and the only points into them is at each end. and that requires us to have some pumping capabilities that perhaps reach 1/2 mile to a mile long. >> another problem, the age of the tunnels. new york's subway system is over 100 years old. >> some places we could probably pump out quicker, but we don't want to collapse the tunnel. >> the next challenge, where to pump all that water. >> largely mostly sea water. right now we'
having covered katrina you get the first wham was, okay, but then the insidious sort of day after day after day -- >> it's going to be a long slaught. >> that's what hit people now. as trite as it sounds, the more you can talk to your family members about it, the more important it is. reach out to neighbors who may not have anything. find out if you can help car-pool kids. find out what's happening in community centers. there are a lot of communities still virtually cut off from the rest of the world and they're not getting information. >> everything connects, you don't have any power, any gas. you don't have gas, you can't get to the store, the pharmacy. talk about people if you need a medication and you have just fumes in your gas tank, you can't get to the pharmacy, may not be open when you get there, what do you do? >> this preparedness issue. everyone should have a five-gallon water container that sits in the basement that's always there. for people on medications, have a zip locked bag with at least two or three days of medication that's labelled. know where there are alternate
katrina the price of gas went up, but that's because that storm struck in a different region of the country. >> well, yes indeed. 25% of the nation's refining capacity is on the gulf coast. katrina was a category 5 storm which meant refineries near the coast took a lot more wind, a lot more water, although sandy was properly named a super storm, it didn't have the sustained wind that we see on the gulf coast with a category 5, and so you didn't have anywhere near the damage to the production facilities. but what makes the new york area, new jersey, new york, connecticut so complicated, matt in, terms of the supply system is you don't have that many refineri refineries. therefore you rely on pipelines and ports, and the ports took quite a bit of damage. you couldn't get barges and ships in there right away. >> right. >> the refineries weren't too badly damaged, but the pipeline was also shut down for a while because it exits on the water. >> let me ask you this then as someone who knows the industry and the delivery system very well. how long do you think this situation is goi
katrina came through. you know what you had to do in terms of working with the federal government. a lot of heat on chris christie, the governor of new jersey for being seen touring his state with president obama and praising his leadership. in your opinion, did governor christie break some unwritten rule? >> look, the governor, whether it's governor of mississippi or new jersey is supposed to do what's in the best interest of his state and his people. and when you have a big disaster like this, a governor knows that not for the next few weeks or months, but for years the federal government's going to be their partner. you know, it's very interesting to me when i didn't criticize george bush after katrina, the press attacked me for not criticizing, saying i was partisan. i did just exactly what chris christie did in this sense. i was taught criticize in private, praise in public, but criticize in private. and besides that, the federal government did a whole lot more right than wrong. for christie and new jersey, their relationship with the federal government is just starting. >> so chris
.c. tomorrow there's heavy rain but no katrinas, don't worry about that. some high winds and mountain snows in the west coast and rockefeller christmas tree lighting, ideal weather, mid to upper 30s. >>> good morning to you. we are looking good today. we have thick pockets of fog out there. overall, we are not expecting the heavy rain to arrive until we hit tonight. i want to take a live look over the city of san francisco and show you the clouds are increasing this morning. as we head throughout the day, highs will be the mild. mostly in the 60s. then as we get into the weekend, we continue the rain chance up to 5 inches is possible over the bay area. resume on file. >> coming up next, tony's back to share more of his good advice for beating holiday stress right after this. ♪ [ female announcer ] let betty crocker do the measuring and get a head start on delicious homemade cookies. ♪ just pour, mix...love. johan comes in a porcelain vessel, crafted with care by a talented blonde from sweden. ♪ smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. [ female announcer ] holiday cookies are a big job. ev
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)